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Local Food. For the People, By the People.
Updated: 26 min 25 sec ago

Turkey Soup Keeps the Cold at Bay

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 11:00

Soup.  I am all about soup these days.  It's easy to make and it fills the house with delicious smells. Making soup is a good way to use up slightly wilted vegetables and leftover grains or noodles. You can throw everything together into a big pot, and leave it to simmer for hours while you make a loaf of bread.  What's better than a bowl of hot soup on a cold day?  I can't think of anything better.

YUMBO TURKEY "GUMBO" -- serves 6

1 package turkey legs (3 in a pack)
1 peeled, sliced red or yellow onion
2 peeled, diced sweet potatoes
3 carrots, cut into chunks
2 tomatoes, diced, or 2 TBSP sundried tomatoes, or 1 can diced tomatoes
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup water or apple juice/cider
1 cup dried apple slices, or 1 apple, peeled and sliced
1-2 TBSP salt and pepper
1 TBSP dried marjoram, thyme and oregano, or 4 sprigs of each herb, fresh

1-2 cups water or vegetable broth
1 handful of frozen peas
1 cup precooked rice, barley or noodles, that have been drained and rinsed 

Optional:  1 TBSP miso paste

Directions:

Plop the turkey legs into a roasting pan, and spread the veggies and apple slices around them.  Sprinkle with the salt, pepper, and herbs.  Pour the water or apple juice into the pan, and bake, covered, at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  

Remove the veggies and apples from the pan with a slotted spoon, and put them in a soup pot.  Dispose of any juices that have accumulated in the pan. 

Pour enough water or vegetable broth over the veggies to cover them, and put the pot on simmer.  

Return the turkey legs to the oven, uncovered, for 15-20 minutes.  Remove the legs from the oven, cut the meat off them and add them to the soup pot with the rice, barley or noodles, and the peas and miso paste, if using.  Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.

Another way:  My friend taught me this, and it is divine.  Perfect to make on a long, chilly day when all ya wanna do is putter around the kitchen.

Simmer a turkey carcass (leftover from a holiday dinner) in 3 bottles of beer (cheap is fine) and a cup of water, with 2 stalks of mashed, fresh lemongrass  stalks, some oregano and parsley, and salt and pepper for 4 hours.  Stir every now and then.  Add a bag of frozen mixed vegetables and cook for another 15 minutes.  Oh, it's SO good!

When The Wind Blows

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 10:33

I was a big fan of the Little House on the Prairie series when I was little, and I used to pretend that I was in my log cabin during a blizzard. The other night it was 4 degrees. Four degrees! Not a blizzard, but still freezing cold! I wanted to cook something quickly so that I could spend as much time by the fireplace as possible.  So I put on my "homesteader woman" thinking cap, looked in my larder, and pulled out the ingredients for dinner.  The  vegetables roast up sweet, the bacon adds a smoky flavor. Our family camped out in the living room by the fireplace and shared this meal together. The wind was howling outside, but we didn't care.  We were together and warm, inside and out.

Gnocchi with Sweet Potatoes
Serves 4

3 sweet potatoes, peeled & diced small
1 red onion, sliced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cauliflower, broken into small pieces
1/4 cup water
Olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/2 cup raisins, plumped in hot water, then drained
1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted
1 package gnocchi
1/2 pound bacon

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place sweet potatoes, red onion, garlic, cauliflower, and water in an oven-proof skillet or roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes and stir to coat. Cover and roast until the vegetables are tender, about 45 minutes. Remove the lid, add the raisins and almonds and let cook another 10 minutes until the vegetables are slightly browned. Fry the bacon until crispy, then drain and crumble. Cook the gnocchi according to package directions. Drain the gnocchi and mix with the vegetables and bacon.

Fabulous Kale Salad with Garlicky Dressing

Mon, 11/25/2013 - 18:30
JuJu and Morgan Maloney serve up some greensThis past Saturday, I made what's become my signature dish, Kale Salad with Garlicky Dressing.  To promote the produce that was available at the Columbia Heights Farmers' Market, I did a cooking demo and I added roasted butternut squash for a sweet twist.  This is wonderful, quick to make salad, that can be served as a side dish, or as the main course with the addition of beans, cheese and toasted nuts.  Everyone who has tried it, loves it.  It was freezing cold, but the smiles of the markets' customers warmed me up.  Now, if only I had a dollar for every time someone said, "Oh, this tastes so good"....

Kale and Roasted Butternut Squash Salad with Garlicky Dressing
1 medium butternut squash, peeled and cut into dice1 Tablespoon dried oregano1 teaspoon salt1/4 ground cinnamon1/4 olive oil
Dressing:3 cloves garlic, peeledJuice of two lemons 1/4 cup soy sauce3 inches fresh ginger, peeled1/2 teaspoon black pepper1 cup olive oil1 bunch fresh kale, washed, leaves removed from stems, and cut into small pieces
Optional:1 grated carrot1 cup grated or shredded red cabbage1/2 cup dried cranberries (craisins)1 cup cooked garbanzo or red beans
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Mix the oregano, salt, cinnamon, and olive oil together and spread it over the squash.  On an oiled cookie sheet, spread the squash and cover tightly with foil. Bake until tender, 30 minutes.  Uncover and bake for 15 minutes more, until squash is brown. 
Put all dressing ingredients, except oil, into blender and puree.  Slowly add oil with blender running on low.  Pour dressing over kale (and other optional ingredients if using) and mix thoroughly, adding optional ingredients if desired.  Let sit for 10 minutes.  Serve topped with several pieces of roasted squash on top.

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